Trait Signal News

Revolutionary vehicle insights platform helps retailers match customers with the right car using artificial intelligence and natural language processing

Trait Signal provides real-time, real-world vehicle opinions structured into an easy-to-read dashboard

Available now to car dealers across the USA and Europe

Los Angeles, California: Automotive analytics start-up, Trait Signal, is making its revolutionary vehicle insight platform available to car retailers across the USA and Europe. The platform scours the internet for real-time, real-world opinions on specific models, and structures them into useful insights to help buyers get a better understanding of each vehicle’s defining traits.

Trait Signal uses proprietary artificial intelligence, natural language processing and human validation to power the platform. Its clients receive access to a web-based dashboard and instant PDF reporting, helps them to identify the best specifications to direct their customers towards to make a sale more likely.

This allows dealerships to develop their sales strategy more efficiently and make more sales. It can be used on the showroom floor or deployed for telephone or online sales.

Trait Signal has already piloted the platform with a number of dealerships in closed beta testing, including Loganville Ford, a franchised Ford dealer based in Atlanta, Georgia.

Dayn Riegal, E-Commerce director of Loganville Ford, said: “Even if your sales force is well trained to sell the new products of your primary brand, do they know how to sell your used products from a wide variety of manufacturers? That’s where Trait Signal is a great value product.”

Tyler Carbone, Founder and CEO of Trait Signal, said: “Until now, dealerships have relied on central marketing & training materials and trial and error to match customers with their perfect car.

“Our solution allows dealers to harness millions of data points to get a real-time, real-world view of their product’s best attributes and how they match to the individual customer’s needs. Our closed beta testing proved our concept and demonstrated a marked difference to dealerships.”

About Trait Signal: Founded in March 2019 by a group of experienced technology entrepreneurs, Trait Signal provides accurate opinion data and sentiment analysis to the automotive sector. Its goal is to help sales, marketing and product development leads build strategies that resonate with car buyers and react to drivers’ changing needs.

Trait Signal turns automotive customer opinions into actionable insights. Every week, we help our customers answer a variety of questions, and each Monday, we choose an interesting tidbit of automotive preference data and talk about it here.

All screenshots in our Tidbit posts are real and from our dashboard. If you have questions or would like to see how Trait Signal can help you, get in touch.



Tyler recently drove the Lamborghini Huracán Evo back-to-back with the McLaren 720s, so we decided to take a look at what Trait Signal had to say about each.

We started by taking a look at the high-level traits most important to drivers of each car and then picked a few example traits to compare driver sentiment between the two: Styling, Torque, and how Stable each felt.

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Screenshot of the most important traits of the Lamborghini Huracán from the Trait Signal dashboard

Styling

While driver sentiment toward the Styling of both cars is positive, it is more so for the Huracán than the 720s. We can also see that drivers tend to have a positive sentiment toward the Styling of Italian cars in general. (Though the correlation isn’t absolute – driver sentiment on Styling is as favorable toward the Aston Martin Vanquish as it is toward the Lamborghini Huracán.)

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard, showing driver sentiment toward Styling of both the Huracán and 720s.

Torque

For Torque, driver preference flipped: sentiment is more positive toward the Torque of the 720s than toward the Torque of the Huracán, as you might expect. We also see that driver sentiment on Torque is inversely correlated with the RPM at which a car hits peak torque, as we’ve seen in other Tidbits.

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard, showing that lower the RPM of peak torque, the more positive is driver sentiment toward Torque.

Stable (& Suspension)

Finally, driver sentiment shows that both cars are Stable, with the trait showing as both important and positive for each. Sentiment toward Stable is more positive for the 720s, however, which makes sense given that sentiment toward Suspension is also more positive toward the 720s than the Huracán.

We’re always interested in feedback, so if you have thoughts or questions, let us know. And if you’d like a full demo, contact us today.

Trait Signal turns automotive customer opinions into actionable insights. Every week, we help our customers answer a variety of questions, and each Monday, we choose an interesting tidbit of automotive preference data and talk about it here.

All screenshots in our Tidbit posts are real and from our dashboard. If you have questions or would like to see how Trait Signal can help you, get in touch.



Last week we looked at midsize luxury cars and decided for this Tidbit to look at the Audi A4. We wanted to compare driver sentiment toward its driving dynamics to those of its high-performance sibling, the Audi S4.

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard showing top traits for the Audi A4

To get a quick comparison of driver sentiment toward driving dynamics, we picked five traits to look at: Grip, Ride, Handling, Steering, and Brakes.

We were curious if commentary from real drivers aligned with our intuition (and Audi’s marketing) that the S4’s driving dynamics are better than the A4’s.

For the first three traits, driver sentiment was in-line with our expectations:

Drivers rate Grip, Ride, and Handling as positive for both the Audi A4 and S4 (as you’d expect for luxury sedans), but for all three, drivers rated the S4 more highly.¹

This all made sense. Audi designed the S4 to be the better sports car, and driver sentiment reflects that.

The story is a bit different for Brakes and Steering, however. Here the A4 again provokes positive sentiment, but surprisingly driver sentiment is negative toward these traits for the S4.² Even though the S4 features upgraded components compared to the S4, drivers’ sentiments are more negative.

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard showing sentiment toward the Steering trait for German Sedans

Why do we see negative driver sentiments, particularly toward steering, when on paper we’d expect the S4 to perform better than the A4 on both? Based on the data we can see, drivers have different expectations for the higher performance S4. Whereas the steering and brakes of the A4 are sufficient and well-liked as a luxury sedan, we can see that drivers have different expectations for high-performance sedans – and on that scale, the S4’s Steering and Brakes are less praised.

We’re always interested in feedback, so if you have thoughts or questions, let us know. And if you’d like a full demo, contact us today.

Notes

  1. Per Trait Signal, actual driver sentiment scores are as follows Grip sentiment is 10 out of 10 for the S4, and 6.7 for the A4. Ride sentiment is 10 out of 10 for the S4, and 8.2 for the A4. Handling sentiment is 10 out of 10 for the S4, and 7.3 for the A4.
  2. Steering sentiment is a positive 8.8 out of 10 for the A4, but neutral for the S4. Brakes sentiment is neutral toward both the A4 and S4, but trends slightly negative for the S4.

Trait Signal turns automotive customer opinions into actionable insights. Every week, we help our customers answer a variety of questions, and each Monday, we choose an interesting tidbit of automotive preference data and talk about it here.

All screenshots in our Tidbit posts are real and from our dashboard. If you have questions or would like to see how Trait Signal can help you, get in touch.



Last week, we looked at the Ford F-150, and with it, some other vehicles in the segment.

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Screenshot of the most important traits of the Ford F-150, and for the broader Truck Segment, from the Trait Signal dashboard

As shown above, two of the most important traits to drivers of trucks are “Price” and “Expensive.”

  1. Price is an important trait, but driver sentiment averages out to Neutral (+0.5 out of 10). The neutral average is because sentiment on Price varies widely between vehicles. Drivers have positive sentiment toward Price for some trucks, and negative sentiment toward Price for others.

  2. Expensive is also an important trait, but, perhaps unsurprisingly, has a consistently Negative sentiment (-4.5 out of 10). Unlike “Price,” drivers don’t seem to have mixed opinions on Expensive. For all the trucks that have the trait, it is negative. (That said, many trucks do not display the trait, and so for those, we can conclude that drivers do not rate them as expensive.)

Nothing too surprising so far, then; drivers have positive sentiments toward the Price of some vehicles, and negative sentiments toward the Price of others.

It gets interesting, though, when we dig into the correlations.

We looked next at which vehicle specifications best predict whether driver sentiment on Price and the result was unexpected.

Of the ten Truck specifications that most strongly predict driver sentiment toward Price, nine of them are functions of vehicle size, and all are positively correlated. Surprisingly, MSRP is only #11 on the list, falling just below our screenshot.

If you look at the data, the bigger the truck, the more positive is buyer sentiment toward its Price, and vice versa. Size is even more predictive than the MSRP of the truck itself of how a buyer will feel about its Price.

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard, showing the ten vehicle specifications which most predict sentiment on "Price"

Larger trucks, even if the MSRP is higher, tend to have more positive driver sentiment on their Price. Smaller trucks, on the other hand (even if lower-priced) tend to draw negative buyer sentiment on their Price.

We’re always interested in feedback, so if you have thoughts or questions, let us know. And if you’d like a full demo, contact us today.

Trait Signal turns automotive customer opinions into actionable insights. Every week, we help our customers answer a variety of questions, and starting today we will be choosing an interesting tidbit of automotive preference data and talking about it here.

All screenshots in our Tidbit posts are real and from our dashboard. If you have questions or would like to see how Trait Signal can help you, get in touch.



Last week we worked with a partner to analyze the new Ford Mustang Shelby GT350. One of the traits most important to drivers is that the car is “Sporty.” The trait ranked as “Very Positive” for the GT350 (7.5 out of 10), and within the Coupe segment driver sentiment toward the trait correlates to several vehicle specifications.

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Screenshot of the Trait Signal dashboard showing top traits for the 2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350

We decided to dig a bit further – what makes a driver describe a car as Sporty, for example, instead of Quick, Sharp, or Well Handling?

As you’d expect, we saw that Sporty correlates positively to specifications like Horsepower and Torque. It also has a negative correlation to specifications like Range, and MPG, likewise as you would expect for performance cars.

Then we noticed something interesting: “Sporty,” as a characteristic drivers liked, is also positively correlated with another specification: Vehicle Width. Why would that be?

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Screenshot of Trait Signal showing the correlation of driver sentiment toward Sporty to Vehicle Width, with GT-350 Highlighted

Digging deeper into the results, we looked at the cars ranked most and least positively for the trait “Sporty,” and noticed a common theme. The coupes for which drivers had the strongest positive sentiment on the trait include many supercars, which tend to be very wide.

Some notable exceptions? The Lamborghini Aventador, while among the very widest of cars, is viewed by drivers as only moderately Sporty (5.0 out of 10). The Lotus Evora 400, on the other hand, despite being quite narrow, has one of the highest sentiments (10 out of 10) we see for this trait.

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Screenshot of Trait Signal showing the correlation of driver sentiment toward Sporty to Vehicle Width, with Aventador Highlighted

We’re always interested in feedback, so if you have thoughts or questions, let us know. And if you’d like a full demo, contact us today.

Founded by Technology Veterans with Experience in Big Data and Natural Language Processing, the Company Uses Modern Technology to Solve a Longstanding Problem in Automotive Marketing and Design

Los Angeles, California: Trait Signal today announced its entry into the automotive analytics space and began taking applicants for its private beta, to begin November 15th. The platform structures automotive opinions into actionable insights, and is more accurate, more scalable, and more affordable than either census data or focus groups.

Trait Signal combines artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and human analysis to collect sentiment data on each vehicle, isolate specific traits, and then correlate those traits back to an extensive database of vehicle specifications. The platform then delivers that data to customers in either automatically generated reports, or a fully interactive dashboard.

“It’s so common to hear people say, ‘Car A is better on paper, but if I had to choose, I’d take car B,’” says Trait Signal Chairman Tyler Carbone. “Trait Signal exists to get the right things on paper, so we know what drivers value about their cars and others’, with data derived from their actual commentary.”

Hunter Williams and Songphon Klabwong lead the company’s growing technology team. Williams’ background is in big data and database development, and Klabwong has been a professor and guest lecturer at multiple universities. Klabwong has published numerous papers on the topic of artificial intelligence, including recent research on AI for medical imaging.

The platform provides three layers of analysis:

  1. Identification: Identify which vehicle traits are most talked about among people who drive a specific make and model, or segment, of vehicle.
  2. Analysis: Determine whether their feedback on each trait is positive or negative.
  3. Insight: Discover which vehicle specifications predicated those opinions, so leaders within the automotive industry know which issues to target within their business strategy and why.

Trait Signal is enrolling select customers now for a private beta and will be generally available starting in January 2020. For more information, visit https://traitsignal.com.

About Trait Signal: Trait Signal provides accurate opinion data and sentiment analysis to help automotive sales, marketing, and product development leaders build strategies that resonate with car buyers and react to drivers’ changing needs. Founded in March 2019, the company has offices in Los Angeles, California, and Bangkok, Thailand.

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